The Joys Of Maturity

The baby boomers, those people born immediately after the war have finally grown up and joined the ranks of the over 60’s.. Generally speaking, older adults in the UK today are healthier, have experience, knowledge, and more disposable income than previous generations. Personally I feel comfortable with my maturity and I’ve finally come to accepting myself – warts and all. I regard this time of life as primetime, a bonus. Not all would agree. Within the 60+ group there appears a division, the majority plan positively for the future, but a minority still feel extremely negative about it.

Knowledge acquired throughout life is invaluable, and shouldn’t be allowed to go to waste. It could be said that we mature folk are chronologically advantaged, because we have so much to offer. Traditionally in past generations old age was coveted, and still in some societies in the world today. Young people sought their grandparents knowledge and guidance and found them a source of wisdom and inspiration. Respect is disappearing and ageism is a fact of modem day life. We mature people must stop the rot before the young successfully trample us down. We need to reclaim or position in society. We need to empower and re-establish ourselves as people who matter. Mature people have a great deal to offer – not least of which is experience.

Today, because of early retirement, many men and women who have had successful careers have time, as well as money, to spend. . Free from the constraints of paid work and family commitment they can indulge their fancies, experiment, experience and explore new horizons. Being alone (but not lonely), and with my family grown and flown, I have the opportunity to do as I please. I can travel and meet new friends, reacquaint myself with old ones, and on a whim, change direction. I play tennis, tend my garden, paint in oils and mess about in boats. I’m a superactive 70-year-old and am physically, mentally and sexually active. I love the challenge that modem life can.offer mature women.

“Don’t look for the flaws as you go through ife
And even when you find them
‘Tis wise and kind to be sometimes blind
And to look for the virtues behind them” (Victorian scrap book)